Roman Architecture Homework Mrs. Pdf

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Sixth Grade
Chapter 10:  "The Roman Republic"
Pages 288-317



Please note:  The dates regarding homework and classwork are subject to change.  Please check the website each day.
Please see the Homepage for a detailed explanation of procedures and expectations.


***Most of information for the following lessons come from the 6th Grade Social Studies textbook World History, Holt McDougal, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, 2012.


Essential Question:  How did Rome become the dominant power in the Mediterranean region?
  • What you will learn:  In this chapter you will learn about the history of the Roman Republic and its growth from a small city into one of the most powerful civilizations of the ancient world.

  • Section 1:Geography and the Rise of Rome
  •         The Big Idea: Rome's location and government helped it become a major power in the ancient world.
  • Section 2: Government and Society
  •         The Big Idea: Rome's tripartite government and written laws helped create a stable society.
  • Section 3: The Late Republic
  •         The Big Idea: The later period of the Roman Republic was marked by wars of expansion and political crises.
New York State Social Studies Framework:
New York State Social Studies Field Guide:
nys-ss-field-guide.pdf
File Size: 1072 kb
File Type: pdf
Download File


New York State P-12
Common Core Learning Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy

Fifth and Sixth Grade Writing Rubric:
RACE Graphic Organizer (including the extended version):
"What does the text SAY?" Graphic Organizer:
"What does the  author MEAN?" Graphic Organizer:
"Why does it MATTER?" Graphic Organizer:
RESOURCES:

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          5)   After clicking on to LEARN360,Discovery Education, and BrainPop, you can then click on the highlighted links found in the lessons.
Homework due Tuesday, March 8th, 2018: GRAPES organizer for p.294-299 (If not done in class), Ancient Rome Physical Map

Classwork, Monday, March 5th , 2018:
  • New York State Social Studies Framework: Click HERE for the New York State Social Studies Framework.
  • New York State Next Generation English Language Arts Learning Standards: Click HERE for the Revised Learning Standards Documents
  • Activate Prior Knowledge:
    • Example: Show key land marks on power-point slide
    • Question: “Who can tell me where ____ is located?”
    • Ms. Taggart will explain the connection between what the students already know and what they are going to learn next.
      • “So when we look at certain landmarks, we know where they are located because of how famous they are. We know when we look at the Eiffel Tower it is located in Paris. It is one of the many things that the country of France is known for. Today we are going to be talking about the landmarks and geography of Italy. Specifically, ancient Rome.”
  • Learning Target:  (Concept Development and Skill Development)
  • Concept Development:
    • Definition of concept: Analyze à examine carefully, breaking into components to understand
    • Critical attributes: Helps students to get good detail from the text
  • Skill Development:
    • Students will analyze (examine carefully, breaking it into components to understand it) the photo on p.291 and p.295
      • “What do we notice about the ruins in this photo? Why are they significant?” (p.291)
      • “What can you tell me about the location of Italy?”
      • Turn to page 295: “What type of map is this? Physical or Political? How do you know? What do political and physical maps show?”; “What can we infer about Italy based off its location? Why?” (p.295)
    • Students will evaluate what they already know about the Roman Republic by filling out the GRAPES Organizer. They will put two facts in each column (you may work with a partner) and then they will use pgs.294 -299 to fill in the rest of the GRAPES organizer.
    • Students will create a map of the Geography of Ancient Rome. They will do this by using their social studies textbook p.295 using the map of ancient Rome as a resource to help develop their maps.
  • Personal Importance/Real Life Importance/Academic Importance:
    • Does anyone have any other reasons why this lesson is important academically?
    • Does anyone have any other reasons why this lesson is important in your life?
  • Guided Practice:
    • Ms. Taggart will explain how significant the importance of the location of Italy is by reading through pages 294-295 in the textbook as a class.
    • Ms. Taggart will demonstrate how she wants the GRAPES organizer to be filled in.
    • Ms. Taggart will also show an example of what the map of Ancient Rome should look like.
    • By the end of the guided practice, students will be able to perform the steps individually.
  • Closure: 
    • Ms. Taggart wants to make sure that the students are completely prepared for the assignment before students begin to work independently.
    • Are students able to correctly describe the concept that was just taught?
    • Are students able to tell why it is important to learn the information that they have just been taught?
    • Are students able to complete the skill that has just been taught to them?
  • Independent Practice:
    • The students will complete the GRAPES organizer for HW if not finished in class.
    • Ancient Rome Physical Map
 
Homework due Wednesday, March 7th, 2018: EXTENDED RACER Response in ESSAY form and picture of the geography or republic of Rome if not finished in class;
Classwork, Tuesday, March 6th , 2018:
  • New York State Social Studies Framework: Click HERE for the New York State Social Studies Framework.
  • New York State Next Generation English Language Arts Learning Standards: Click HERE for the Revised Learning Standards Documents
  • Activate Prior Knowledge:
    • Example first: In America we have a republic. Why is that?
    • Question: “What is a republic?”
    • Students will write their answers on white boards.
    • Ms. Taggart will explain the connection between what the students already know and what they are going to learn next.
  • Learning Target:  (Concept Development and Skill Development)
  • Concept Development:
    • Definition of concept: Analyze
    • Critical attributes: Helps students to gain a better understanding of the text.
  • Skill Development:
    • Students will analyze (examine carefully, breaking it into components to understand it) the text on pages 296-299 as a class. They will do this by reading the text together or separately to gather information about the Republic of Rome.
    • Students will explain why Rome’s location and government helped it to become a major power in the ancient world. They will do this by answering the question: “How did Rome’s location and government become a major power in the ancient world?” in EXTENDED RACER format. Students will then put their EXTENDED RACER format into paragraph form. And provide an image that goes along with their EXTENDED response.
  • Personal Importance/Real Life Importance/Academic Importance:
    • Does anyone have any other reasons why this lesson is important academically?
    • Does anyone have any other reasons why this lesson is important in your life?
  • Guided Practice:
    • Ms. Taggart will explain why the government of Rome helped it to become a major power in the ancient world.
  • Closure: 
    • Ms. Taggart wants to make sure that the students are completely prepared for the assignment before students begin to work independently.
    • Are students able to correctly describe the concept that was just taught?
    • Are students able to tell why it is important to learn the information that they have just been taught?
    • Are students able to complete the skill that has just been taught to them?
  • Independent Practice:
    • The students will complete their EXTENDED RACER essay if not finished in class
 
Homework due Thursday, March 8th , 2018: Roman Republic Section 2 Packet
Classwork, Wednesday,   March 7th, 2018:
  • New York State Social Studies Framework: Click HERE for the New York State Social Studies Framework.
  • New York State Next Generation English Language Arts Learning Standards: Click HERE for the Revised Learning Standards Documents
  • Activate Prior Knowledge:
    • Government has changed over time. Name some types of government that you know of!
      • Republic/representative, dictatorship
      • How do you think these forms of government have affected society?
    • Question: What type of government do we have in the United States? How do you know?
    • Video???
    • Ms. Taggart will explain the connection between what the students already know and what they are going to learn next.
  • Learning Target:  (Concept Development and Skill Development)
  • Concept Development:
    • Definition of concept Analyze: examine carefully, breaking it into components to understand it.
    • Critical attributes: analyzation helps students to grasp a better understanding of the text and squeeze out all the key important information that is being represented.
    • Examples: Ringing out a sponge
  • Skill Development:
    • Students will analyze (examine carefully, breaking it into components to understand it) the text on pages 302-307 in the social studies textbook. Students will do this by participating in reading these pages out loud as a class. I will know students have read these pages by the completion of the section 2 Roman Republic packet.
    • Students will describe the “Roman Government”, “Written Laws Keep Order”, “The Roman Forum”. Students will do this by participating with group members and reporting on the details of one of the given sections listed above.
    • Students will complete the section two Roman Republic packet while the other students are reporting their information about their section that they are reporting on. I will know students have gathered the information needed when the students complete section two Roman Republic packet. 
      • Using the textbook and Roman Republic section two packet, students will be able to explain what a tripartite government is and each responsibility of each part of government. Students will do this by reading pages 302-303 in the textbook. Students will also do this by completing the Roman Republic Section 2 packet. I will know students have done this by completing the section 2 packet.
      • Using the textbook and Roman Republic section two packet students will identify key vocabulary words in the text. They will do this by looking up the definition of the words using the textbook. I will know students have done this by completing section 2 of Roman Republic packet.
  • Personal Importance/Real Life Importance/Academic Importance:
    • Does anyone have any other reasons why this lesson is important academically?
    • Does anyone have any other reasons why this lesson is important in your life?
  • Guided Practice:
    • Ms. Taggart will explain how to analyze the two pages 302-307 in the social studies textbook.
    • Ms. Taggart will explain how to fill out the section 2 Roman Republic packet.
    • Gradually, students will begin to do the steps individually.
    • By the end of the guided practice, students will be able to perform the steps individually.
  • Closure: 
    • Ms. Taggart wants to make sure that the students are completely prepared for the assignment before students begin to work independently.
    • Are students able to correctly describe the concept that was just taught?
    • Are students able to tell why it is important to learn the information that they have just been taught?
    • Are students able to complete the skill that has just been taught to them?
  • Independent Practice:
    • The students will finish their Section 2 Roman Republic packet
 

Homework due Tuesday, March 13th, 2018: (p.326-328): “What are the accomplishments of Rome?” Students will answer answer this question in paragraph form using the RACER format.
Classwork, Monday,  March 12th , 2018:
  • New York State Social Studies Framework: Click HERE for the New York State Social Studies Framework.
  • New York State Next Generation English Language Arts Learning Standards: Click HERE for the Revised Learning Standards Documents
  • Activate Prior Knowledge:
    • Power can be good and bad
    • Question:
      • What is an example of good power?
      • What is an example of “bad” power?
    • Ms. Taggart will read, “Building Background” on page 308 in textbook and discuss with students.
    • Ms. Taggart will explain the connection between what the students already know and what they are going to learn next.
  • Learning Target:  (Concept Development and Skill Development)
  • Concept Development:
    • Definition of concept: Analyze: (examine carefully, breaking it into components to understand it).
  • Skill Development:
    • Students will describe the late republic of Rome by following along Ms. Taggart’s PowerPoint and taking thorough notes in their social studies textbooks.
    • Students will explain why the later period of the Roman Republic was marked by wars, expansion, and crisis (p.308).
    • Students will identify who Spartacus is and why he made history in Ancient Rome. They will do this by reading a biography called, “Spartacus” and completing a follow up activity attached to the article.
  • Personal Importance/Real Life Importance/Academic Importance:
    • Does anyone have any other reasons why this lesson is important academically?
    • Does anyone have any other reasons why this lesson is important in your life?
  • Guided Practice:
    • Ms. Taggart will explain the importance of this Roman Period of the Late Republic by using a PowerPoint to explain the key concepts she would like students to take away.
    • Ms. Taggart will explain the directions of the follow up activity of the “Spartacus” biography by showing examples of epitaphs and how students will create one for Spartacus.
    • Gradually, students will begin to do the steps individually.
    • By the end of the guided practice, students will be able to perform the steps individually.
  • Closure: 
    • Ms. Taggart wants to make sure that the students are completely prepared for the assignment before students begin to work independently.
    • Are students able to correctly describe the concept that was just taught?
    • Are students able to tell why it is important to learn the information that they have just been taught?
    • Are students able to complete the skill that has just been taught to them?
  • Independent Practice:
    • The students will finish their “Spartacus” biography activities.
    • (p.326-328): “What are the accomplishments of Rome?” Students will answer answer this question in paragraph form using the RACER format.
 

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 26, 2018
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26-MARCH 2, 2018: Due to Project Know, there will not be social studies classwork or homework this week.

Homework due Tuesday, February 27th, 2018: NONE
Classwork, Monday, February 26th, 2018:
  • New York State Social Studies Framework: Click HERE for the New York State Social Studies Framework.
  • New York State Next Generation English Language Arts Learning Standards: Click HERE for the Revised Learning Standards Documents
  • Activate Prior Knowledge
    • Question: “How many feet are in one mile?”
    • Ms. Taggart will explain the connection between what the students already know and what they are going to learn next.
  • Learning Target:  (Concept Development and Skill Development)
  • Concept Development:
    • Definition of concept: Proportions: a number that is a part of the whole
  • Skill Development:
    • Students will analyze (examine carefully, breaking it into components to understand it) p. 330-331 in their social studies textbooks.
    • Students will read the article, “Roman Roads” to gather more information about how the roads were made.
    • Students will explain how the map shows, “all roads lead to Rome”.
    • Students will evaluate how many feet are in 50,000 miles of Roman Roads. They will do this by creating a proportion.
  • Personal Importance/Real Life Importance/Academic Importance:
    • Does anyone have any other reasons why this lesson is important academically?
    • Does anyone have any other reasons why this lesson is important in your life?
  • Guided Practice:
    • Ms. Taggart will demonstrate how to form a proportion on the smartboard. Ms. Taggart will start off with a simple proportion and then demonstrate how to set up a proportion to find out, “How many feet are in 50,000 miles of Roman Roads?”
    • Gradually, students will begin to do the steps individually.
    • By the end of the guided practice, students will be able to perform the steps individually.
  • Closure: 
    • Ms. Taggart wants to make sure that the students are completely prepared for the assignment before students begin to work independently.
    • Are students able to correctly describe the concept that was just taught?
    • Are students able to tell why it is important to learn the information that they have just been taught?
    • Are students able to complete the skill that has just been taught to them?
  • Independent Practice:
    • The students will finish their proportion.











































LESSONS FROM THE PREVIOUS YEARS

Homework Due : Write six facts that you can learn from the text features on pages 294-299 in our textbook. 
Classwork, Monday,:
  • Common core standards addressed:
  • SS.CC.6. COMPARATIVE CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS IN THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE (ca. 600 B.C.E. – ca. 500 C.E.): As complex societies and civilizations change over time, their political and economic structures evolve. A golden age may be indicated when there is an extended period of time that is peaceful, prosperous, and demonstrates great cultural achievements.
  • Today we will be using a new strategy called GRAPES to help us determine what we already know about the Roman Republic. 
  • The GRAPES format is an acronym that stands for Geography, Religion, Arts and Architecture, Politics, Economics, and Social Structures.   
  • Students will first determine what they know about Rome and fit their knowledge into one of each of the GRAPES categories. Then students will pair up and try to come up with a more complete picture of Rome. The goal is to have two or more facts written for each letter. 
  • The homework will be to look at the text features on pages 294 to 299 in the textbook and write down six pieces of information that you can get from the text features. 


​Homework Due Wednesday, : Read pages 298-299 and do a RACECE organizer for the reading check question on page 299, “What were the differences between plebeians and patricians?”
Classwork, Tuesday, :
  • Common core standards addressed:
  • SS.CC.6. COMPARATIVE CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS IN THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE (ca. 600 B.C.E. – ca. 500 C.E.): As complex societies and civilizations change over time, their political and economic structures evolve. A golden age may be indicated when there is an extended period of time that is peaceful, prosperous, and demonstrates great cultural achievements.
  • Today we will be continuing to work on using our GRAPES strategy to take notes. We will take notes as a class as we read through our text, putting any information we pull from the text into a GRAPES category. 
  • For homework, students will read pages 298-299 and do a RACECE organizer for the reading check question on page 299, “What were the differences between plebeians and patricians?” Use the writing prompts suggestions found above.
RACE Graphic Organizer (including the extended version):
Homework Due Thursday, : Read pages 304-305 and do GRAPES notes. GRAPES notes involve pulling relevant facts out of the text as you read and putting it into one of the GRAPES categories (Geography, Religion, Arts and Architecture, Politics, Economics, and Social Structure).
Classwork, Wednesday, :
  • Common core standards addressed:
  • SS.CC.6. COMPARATIVE CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS IN THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE (ca. 600 B.C.E. – ca. 500 C.E.): As complex societies and civilizations change over time, their political and economic structures evolve. A golden age may be indicated when there is an extended period of time that is peaceful, prosperous, and demonstrates great cultural achievements.
  • Today in class, we will be learning and practicing a new learning strategy called a Freeze Scene. 
  • In a Freeze Scene, group members have to show a concept (in this case the three different segments of the Roman Republican government) by freezing in a position demonstrating your concept. This will appear as if you paused a movie or play at an important moment. 
  • We will plan our scenes today and perform them tomorrow. 
  • For homework, students will read pages 304-305 and do GRAPES notes. GRAPES notes involve pulling relevant facts out of the text as you read and putting it into one of the GRAPES categories (Geography, Religion, Arts and Architecture, Politics, Economics, and Social Structure).
Homework Due Friday, : Read pages 306-307 and do GRAPES notes. GRAPES notes involve pulling relevant facts out of the text as you read and putting it into one of the GRAPES categories (Geography, Religion, Arts and Architecture, Politics, Economics, and Social Structure).
Classwork, Thursday, :
  • Common core standards addressed:
  • ​SS.CC.6. COMPARATIVE CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS IN THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE (ca. 600 B.C.E. – ca. 500 C.E.): As complex societies and civilizations change over time, their political and economic structures evolve. A golden age may be indicated when there is an extended period of time that is peaceful, prosperous, and demonstrates great cultural achievements.
  • Today in class we will present our Freeze Scenes (see yesterday's entry).
  • For homework, students will read pages 306-307 and do GRAPES notes. GRAPES notes involve pulling relevant facts out of the text as you read and putting it into one of the GRAPES categories (Geography, Religion, Arts and Architecture, Politics, Economics, and Social Structure).
Homework Due Monday, : Read Section 3, pages 309-313 and do GRAPES notes. GRAPES notes involve pulling relevant facts out of the text as you read and putting it into one of the GRAPES categories (Geography, Religion, Arts and Architecture, Politics, Economics, and Social Structure).
Classwork, Friday, :
  • Common core standards addressed:
  • ​ SS.CC.6. COMPARATIVE CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS IN THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE (ca. 600 B.C.E. – ca. 500 C.E.): As complex societies and civilizations change over time, their political and economic structures evolve. A golden age may be indicated when there is an extended period of time that is peaceful, prosperous, and demonstrates great cultural achievements.
  • Today in class we will be working on GRAPES notes in pairs on the pages we have for homework.
  • For homework read Section 3, pages 309-313 and do GRAPES notes. GRAPES notes involve pulling relevant facts out of the text as you read and putting it into one of the GRAPES categories (Geography, Religion, Arts and Architecture, Politics, Economics, and Social Structure).
Homework Due Tuesday, : Create Section 1 vocabulary cards, found on page 294. Students can write out the vocabulary on a sheet of paper if they do not have index cards.
Classwork, Monday, :
  • Common core standards addressed:
  • ​ SS.CC.6. COMPARATIVE CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS IN THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE (ca. 600 B.C.E. – ca. 500 C.E.): As complex societies and civilizations change over time, their political and economic structures evolve. A golden age may be indicated when there is an extended period of time that is peaceful, prosperous, and demonstrates great cultural achievements.
  • Today we will be creating timelines about the Roman Republic using the documents below. 
  • For homework, students will create vocabulary cards for Section 1, found on page 294. If students do not have index cards they can write out the vocabulary on a sheet of paper. 
083Homework Due Wednesday, : Section 2 vocabulary cards found on page 302 the text book. Put the vocabulary term on one side of the card, and the definition on the other. If you do not have index cards you write out the vocabulary on paper. Begin studying for the test.  See Study Guide below.
Classwork, Tuesday, :
  • Common core standards addressed:
  • SS.CC.6. COMPARATIVE CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS IN THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE (ca. 600 B.C.E. – ca. 500 C.E.): As complex societies and civilizations change over time, their political and economic structures evolve. A golden age may be indicated when there is an extended period of time that is peaceful, prosperous, and demonstrates great cultural achievements.
  • Today we will be writing short biographies (4-5 paragraphs) on historical figures in the Roman Republic. 
  • Pairs and individuals will each have one historical figure to write about.
  • We will share these bios at the end of class. 
  • For homework students will complete Section 2 vocabulary cards found on page 294 of the text book. Put the vocabulary term on one side of the card, and the definition on the other. If you do not have index cards you write out the vocabulary on paper.
Homework Due Thursday, : Section 3 vocabulary cards found on page 308 of the text book. Put the vocabulary term on one side of the card, and the definition on the other. If you do not have index cards you write out the vocabulary on paper. Study for the TEST ON FRIDAY. 
Classwork, Wednesday, :
  • Common core standards addressed:
  • SS.CC.6. COMPARATIVE CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS IN THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE (ca. 600 B.C.E. – ca. 500 C.E.): As complex societies and civilizations change over time, their political and economic structures evolve. A golden age may be indicated when there is an extended period of time that is peaceful, prosperous, and demonstrates great cultural achievements.
  • Today we will be creating a master list of the GRAPES notes we have been working in during this chapter.
  • Students will have some brainstorming time to find information from the chapter that pertains to each letter of GRAPES (Geography, Religion, Arts and Architecture, Politics, Economics, and Social Structure).
  • Then we will compile a list as a class and Miss G will scribe students' information onto a master list on the SmartBoard, which students will copy down. A typed up version will also appear below after it is written in class. 
  • ​For homework students will complete Section 3 vocabulary cards found on page 308 of the text book. Put the vocabulary term on one side of the card, and the definition on the other. If you do not have index cards you write out the vocabulary on paper.
class_grapes_notes.pdf
File Size: 821 kb
File Type: pdf
Download File


Homework Due Friday, : Section 3 vocabulary cards found on page 308 of the text book. Put the vocabulary term on one side of the card, and the definition on the other. If you do not have index cards you write out the vocabulary on paper. Study for the TEST ON FRIDAY. 
Classwork, Thursday, :
  • Common core standards addressed:
  • SS.CC.6. COMPARATIVE CLASSICAL CIVILIZATIONS IN THE EASTERN HEMISPHERE (ca. 600 B.C.E. – ca. 500 C.E.): As complex societies and civilizations change over time, their political and economic structures evolve. A golden age may be indicated when there is an extended period of time that is peaceful, prosperous, and demonstrates great cultural achievements.
  • Today we will be playing Jeopardy to study for our test on Friday about the Roman Republic. 
10.20.15.adapted.nys.5.6.writing.evaluation.rubric.pdf
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10.20.15.adapted.nys.5.6.writing.evaluation.rubric.docx
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race.graphic.organizer.extended.10.15.pdf
File Size: 96 kb
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race.graphic.organizer.extended.10.15.docx
File Size: 33 kb
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what_does_the_text_say.pdf
File Size: 26 kb
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what_does_the_text_say.docx
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what_does_the_author_mean.pdf
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what_does_the_author_mean.docx
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why_does_it_matter.pdf
File Size: 26 kb
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why_does_it_matter.docx
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geography_of_ancient_rome_map_directions.pdf
File Size: 357 kb
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geography_of_ancient_rome_map_directions.docx
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​GRAPES PowerPoint:
grapes_notes_ppt.pptx
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race.graphic.organizer.extended.10.15.pdf
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race.graphic.organizer.extended.10.15.docx
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the_ancient_roman_republic_timeline.docx
File Size: 18 kb
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the_ancient_roman_republic_timeline.pdf
File Size: 134 kb
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The Roman Republic Study Guide:
roman_republic_study_guide-1.docx
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The Roman Republic Study Guide:
roman_republic_study_guide-1.pdf
File Size: 65 kb
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List of Illustrations viii

Contributors xiii

Maps/General Images xviii

Introduction 1

1. Italic Architecture of the Earlier First Millennium BCE 6
Jeffrey A. Becker

2. Rome and Her Neighbors: Greek Building Practices in Republican Rome 27
Penelope J.E. Davies

3. Creating Imperial Architecture 45
Inge Nielsen

4. Columns and Concrete: Architecture from Nero to Hadrian 63
Caroline K. Quenemoen

5. The Severan Period 82
Edmund V. Thomas

6. The Architecture of Tetrarchy 106
Emanuel Mayer

7. Architect and Patron 127
James C. Anderson, jr.

8. Plans, Measurement Systems, and Surveying: The Roman Technology of Pre-Building 140
John R. Senseney

9. Materials and Techniques 157
Lynne C. Lancaster and Roger B. Ulrich

10. Labor Force and Execution 193
Rabun Taylor

11. Urban Sanctuaries: The Early Republic to Augustus 207
John W. Stamper

12. Monumental Architecture of Non-Urban Cult Places in Roman Italy 228
Tesse D. Stek

13. Fora 248
James F.D. Frakes

14. Funerary Cult and Architecture 264
Kathryn J. McDonnell

15. Building for an Audience: The Architecture of Roman Spectacle 281
Hazel Dodge

16. Roman Imperial Baths and Thermae 299
Fikret K. Yegül

17. Courtyard Architecture in the Insulae of Ostia Antica 324
Roger B. Ulrich

18. Domus/Single Family House 342
John R. Clarke

19. Private Villas: Italy and the Provinces 363
Mantha Zarmakoupi

20. Romanization 381
Louise Revell

21. Streets and Facades 399
Ray Laurence

22. Vitruvius and his Influence 412
Ingrid D. Rowland

23. Ideological Applications: Roman Architecture and Fascist Romanità 426
Genevieve S. Gessert

24. Visualizing Architecture Then and Now: Mimesis and the Capitoline Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus 446
Melanie Grunow Sobocinski

25. Conservation 462
William Aylward

Glossary 480

References 501

Index 565

“This comprehensive volume of almost 600 pages deserves praise. Its 25 chapters have a chronological as well as a thematic focus, and cover the broader Roman Empire as well as specific case studies.” (Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 1 March 2015)

“The Companion is an important study that opens up new avenues for discussion and consideration, challenges what is currently perceived to be the approved wisdom on Roman architecture and encourages a new approach to understanding the material culture of a society that remains evident and influential in our own.”  (Reference Reviews, 1 October 2014)

“Summing Up: Recommended.  Lower-division undergraduates through graduate students.”  (Choice, 1 June 2013)

""The line-up of contributers is extremley impressive, with most chapters written by the very scolors whose names immediately sprang to my own mind on seeing their titles"" (The Journal of Roman Studies, May 2016)

 

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