Qualities Of A Good Prefect Essay

  • Hi, could you please check my prefect application letter and let me know if there is anything i should change or add. Also, i think its really short - what do you think??

    Dear __

    I am applying to be a prefect because I think that this is a good opportunity for me to give something back for all of the opportunities the school has given me and the help I received from previous prefects when I first came to _____.

    I am a responsible, reliable and hardworking student. Furthermore, I am very punctual and have a high attendance. These qualities would make me a good prefect because I will always be there and on time for duties and after school events and can be trusted to be a good representative for ____. Additionally, I can work well in a team and with others which would help me as a prefect as I believe that part of the role is to help and work with others for example whilst on duty or helping another student.

    I would be a role model to the younger years by ensuring I always have correct uniform and behave appropriately around the school. In addition, I would represent the school by helping other students around the school; especially the year seven’s that will join in September as I know that it can be daunting moving schools. I would also carry out break and lunch duties and attend after school events such as open evenings.

    I hope you consider my application for the role of a prefect and look forward to hearing your decision.

    Yours sincerely

    ______

  • Yeah that's good enough.

    But people have to do application statements to become a prefect? I just had to turn up to a meeting and became a prefect in 5 minutes... no questions/statements etc. But that could be because I'm held in higher regard by the school than other people, not me being big-headed - if you achieve a particular award in the school, you're pretty much a saint.

  • [QUOTE=pink.lemonade;54946065]Hi, could you please check my prefect application letter and let me know if there is anything i should change or add. Also, i think its really short - what do you think??

    Dear __

    I am applying to be a prefect because I think that this is a good opportunity for me to give something back for all of the opportunities the school has given me and the help I received from previous prefects when I first came to _____.

    I am a responsible, reliable and hardworking student. Furthermore, I am very punctual and have a high attendance. These qualities would make me a good prefect because I will always be there and on time for duties and after school events and can be trusted to be a good representative for ____. Additionally, I can work well in a team and with others which would help me as a prefect as I believe that part of the role is to help and work with others for example whilst on duty or helping another student.

    I would be a role model to the younger years by ensuring I always have correct uniform and behave appropriately around the school. In addition, I would represent the school by helping other students around the school; especially the year seven’s that will join in September as I know that it can be daunting moving schools. I would also carry out break and lunch duties and attend after school events such as open evenings.

    I hope you consider my application for the role of a prefect and look forward to hearing your decision.

    Yours sincerely

    ______[/QUAl

    Have you done anything in the past to help the school that you could put down?

    Posted from TSR Mobile

  • What are the qualities needed to be a successful school leader? This is the question I set out to answer in a new book for which I interviewed some of the UK's best headteachers.

    It started with a challenge: imagine you are cast adrift on a desert island with a school full of children in desperate need of a great headteacher. What eight qualities would you take with you to run your desert island school?

    The challenge, based on the long-running BBC radio programme Desert Island Discs, produced a treasure trove of contributions from school leaders. Their insights, stories and experiences confirmed my belief that, while there might well be a common set of qualities that are crucial for successful leadership, there is also scope for different leadership styles.

    Far from being clones enslaved by government diktat or professional orthodoxy, the best headteachers run their schools through conviction and often sheer personality. Even so, they do share some vital leadership qualities. So here are eight to take with you to your own desert island.

    1. Vision

    It's easy to dismiss the concept of "vision" as vague and woolly, but the best school leaders are visionaries with a clear sense of moral purpose. Successful leaders have "great vision – the ability to formulate and shape the future, rather than be shaped by events", says Richard Harman, headmaster of Uppingham School, Rutland.

    2. Courage

    Successful school leaders show great determination, with the willpower and patience to see things through. They are willing to take risks and are steadfast in challenging under-performance or poor behaviour. "There's a mental courage that you don't waver from," says Madeleine Vigar, principal of the Castle Partnership Academy Trust in Haverhill, Suffolk.

    3. Passion

    "We are there for the children and we mustn't ever forget that," says Llyn Codling, executive headteacher of Portswood, St Mary's and Weston Park primary schools, Southampton. Like Codling, successful school leaders are passionate about teaching and learning and show great commitment to children. They take an active interest in their pupils' work – and that of their staff.

    4. Emotional intelligence

    Successful school leaders are team-builders. They understand the importance of relationships, empower their staff and pupils and show great empathy. "Get the relationships right – open, trusting, humorous – and much else follows naturally," says Kingsbridge Community College principal, Roger Pope. "They feel motivated. They want to follow you."

    5. Judgment

    The best headteachers show great judgment, make the right calls and are wise leaders. Crucially, however, it isn't simply a matter of acting alone. It's about involving the whole school community and taking people forward together.

    6. Resilience

    The business of headship is full-on and, at times, gruelling. Successful school leaders are optimistic and resilient, remain calm in a crisis and are energetic and positive at all times. "It about really knowing yourself and having personal strategies so you are able to steady yourself in stormy waters," says Catherine Paine, primary head and assistant CEO of REAch2 Academy Trust, Waltham Forest.

    7. Persuasion

    The best school leaders are confident communicators and storytellers. They are great persuaders and listeners, adept at describing 'the story of their school' to any audience. They are also great motivators. "Getting people to do things and go that extra mile lies at the heart of good leadership," says Kenny Frederick, former headteacher at George Green's School, Tower Hamlets.

    8. Curiosity

    Successful school leaders are outward-looking and curious. As Teresa Tunnadine, headteacher at the Compton School in Barnet, states: "Headship is about having at least one foot outside of the school looking at what's going on elsewhere and picking up good ideas." They are excellent networkers and great opportunists, always in touch with events.

    Jeremy Sutcliffe is author of 8 Qualities of Successful School Leaders: the desert island challenge, published by Bloomsbury

    This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional. Looking for your next role? Take a look at Guardian jobs for schools for thousands of the latest teaching, leadership and support jobs

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